Optical Lickometer

Record lick events and deliver liquid reward in functional imaging assays
Product ID: 1020

$125.00 USD

0 in stock

Quantity:



Description

The optical lickometer (beta) is a device used to deliver liquid rewards and measure lick events in functional imaging and sensitive electrophysiology assays. It contains a steel drinking tube, a photogate positioned to measure licks, and a visible white LED for training feedback. The lickometer mounts securely to the end of a 6mm ThorLabs mini-series post. The mounting setup shown in the product photos (NOT included) allows coarse adjustment in 3 dimensions, and rotation about 2. Its components are itemized on the wiki, and can be selected to match the dimensions of your assay. NOTE: while an earlier lickometer variant has been used in the wild, the current design revision is new and HAS NOT BEEN EVALUATED. If you order it, we will work closely with you to ensure that it functions as intended.

Specifications

Photogate

  • Method: Infrared emitter and phototransistor
  • Emitter beam angle (between half-intensity points): 10°
  • Emitter peak wavelength: 880nm
  • Phototransistor contains a visible light rejection filter
  • Phototransistor acceptance angle (nominal): 18°

Visible LED

  • Color: White
  • Mounted directly facing the subject
  • Software adjustable intensity control (with Bpod)
  • Hardware adjustable intensity control (with the Bpod port interface board)

Drinking tube

  • 15Ga stainless steel hypodermic tube
  • Directly connects to 1/16" ID silicone laboratory tubing for liquid delivery

Housing material

Interface to Bpod

Dimensions

  • Diameter: 2.2cm (7/8")
  • Height (excluding drinking tube): 2cm (3/4")

Comments (2)


Josh
January 28, 2018, 5:36 pm PST

As viewed above, the emitter is on the right, and the phototransistor is on the left. Purple wires should be connected to GND.


rchitwood
January 20, 2018, 2:53 pm PST

is there a circuit diagram for this? alternatively, is there an easy method for determining which side the emitter/detector are located?