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flexible Pulse Train duration
#1
Hello,
We are planning to use PulsePal 2 to generate pulse trains for our mouse optogenetic experiments. Instead of a pre-defined fixed pulse train duration, we'd like to keep it flexible: the duration will depend on the animal's position and moving velocity. For example, when a mouse enters a certain location with fast speed, it will trigger PulsePal to start the pulse train with a pre-defined frequency. The pulse train will stop until either of the following condition is met: (1) the animal leaves the location or (2) the animal stays in that location but stops moving (i.e., speed is below a threshold). 

The only way I can think of now is to use the toggle mode (or pulse gated mode). Then let the program keeps checking the animals' position and velocity with extremely long pulse train duration. Then if the animal goes to the specific location, the program will send the trigger to start the pulse; when the animal slows down, the program will send another trigger to stop the pulse. But the stimulation will still be on between the first and the second trigger. I was wondering if there is other way to do it?

Thank you very much!
Emma
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#2
Hello Emma,

Toggle and Pulse-Gated modes are probably your best bet if you need the start and stop signals to come from other hardware.
If the PC is doing video tracking to determine movement speed, you can also have the PC send a 'start' command via the TriggerPulsePal() command, and a 'stop' command via the AbortPulsePal() command.

-Josh
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#3
(12-10-2021, 06:28 AM)Josh Wrote: Hello Emma,

Toggle and Pulse-Gated modes are probably your best bet if you need the start and stop signals to come from other hardware.
If the PC is doing video tracking to determine movement speed, you can also have the PC send a 'start' command via the TriggerPulsePal() command, and a 'stop' command via the AbortPulsePal() command.

-Josh

Thank you!
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